3 Benefits of Peer Accountability to Achieve Your Career Goals

As we move into the New Year, we start making resolutions and goals for 2017. We often set goals for our career and do not stick with them.

There are many reasons why we don’t stick with our goals. Perhaps they are not goals we want to accomplish in the first place. Or our goals are too lofty to accomplish. Or perhaps our self doubts get in our way. Perhaps one of our greatest hindrances to achieving our goals is that we don’t have anyone holding us accountable.

It is common at the executive level for CEOs, Presidents or Senior VPs to have mastermind groups, round-table discussions, or peer coaching. One of the reasons they are so successful is because they have another set of eyes on their business strategy.

Sadly, it is not as common for mid-career professionals to seek the support of their peers. Peer accountability is one of the best means to help develop strategy to forward your career, increase your performance, and achieve your goals.

Here’s are the top 3 reasons peer accountability is essential for your career success:

1. Peer Accountability allows you to look at your goals from all angles: When we set goals we often do not see all sides of the situation. Having peer accountability helps bring perspective to your situation and carefully evaluate all aspects of your goals – from the sincerity, to the strategy, to the execution of your goals.

2. Accountability helps ensure you have an effective strategy: Once you have a stronger perspective, you are better positioned to form concrete strategies. Peer accountability allows you to build measurable goals and to identify specific benchmarks with a team to help you work out any roadblocks that could get in your way.

3. Accountability helps you stay engaged:  Sharing your goals helps affirm and stick with your commitment. Moreover, it’s fun to celebrate your successes and wins with those who have been along the journey with you.

That is why I suggest that coming into the New Year, you do one of several suggestions in committing to yourself and career goals:

1) Set goals and hold yourself accountable: If you are going to set goals for this New Year, hold yourself to it. Do not allow yourself to not move forward and make your failed goal more proof that you’re not good enough or deserving. No more self-fulling prophesies of failure! It is better to set no goals then to set them and not pursue them.

2) Get an accountability partner and meet with them regularly: Make sure this is someone who is committed to themselves and to you. When you set meetings, stick with them. I recommend that you call to check in once a week and meet in person once a month. Set a format to your meetings and stick with it.

3) Join a peer accountability group:  I’m hosting a monthly Peer Strategy Group on Feb 7th, March 7th, April 4th, May 2nd, August 8th, Sept. 12th, Oct. 10th, and Nov. 14th from 6-8 PM MST. You can join us in-person at my office off Colorado and I-25 or virtually using Zoom.

This group is designed to provide a safe space to receive insights and honest feedback about your career goals, to brainstorm solutions to problems in the workplace, and to build relationships. You will also connect with an accountability partner to support you in between meetings.

I will also be having top coaches in their field present on their area of expertise during each meeting. Topics include networking coaching, resume writing, financial coaching, and effective communication in the workplace.

To learn more or register, please email me: danielle@innercompasscoach.com.

4 Things You Can Do If You’re Burned Out From a Job Transition

4 Things You Can Do If You’re Burned Out From a Job Transition  

Published on SharpHeels: http://sharpheels.com/2016/12/making-a-career-change/

Have you been spending hours contemplating your career direction, applying to hundreds of jobs online, and talking about your next career steps? Are you sick of the pressure of everyone asking you “What’s next?” Are you at the point where thinking about your career for one more moment makes you feel like you are going to go mad? If you have answered yes to one or all of these questions, you are probably experiencing career transition burnout.

We are not properly taught how to handle career transition. Most career services teach us that we need to take career tests and network to make a transition. This is great advice when we are in the proper frame of mind. However, if we aren’t, this advice can be counterproductive and lead to compulsive job searching, eventual disillusionment, and burnout. It seems counterintuitive, but if we give ourselves the permission, time, and space to be introspective and reflect on what we really want, we can more easily pinpoint what is next. We need to take a break from the career transition process.

If you are burned out from your career transition, these four steps can help you re-energize so you can return to the process with more motivation and clarity.

  • Give yourself permission to not think about your future career. This is easier said than done, but if you focus on giving yourself enough time and space, your next steps will become clear. We very rarely have epiphanies when we overthink, so limit how much time you allow yourself to ponder your next career next steps. Spend quality time with loved ones to distract yourself or think about other things that are important to you, redirecting your thoughts if your mind starts to wander.  Even if you’ve already taken time off, if that time was filled with anxiety and pressure, it really was not time off. You will be amazed at all the “aha moments” that come when you give yourself permission to not think about your future career–usually when you least expect them.
  • Cease all career research and job applications. It is amazing how addicted we can become to applying to jobs online. With access to job websites at the touch of a finger, it can be hard to take a break, but it is important to do so. When we are burned out, we are more likely to make mistakes on our applications and apply for roles that are not a good fit. Even a few days’ break will make you more mentally clear. You’ll be able to make better decisions about the type of jobs to target, less likely to make mistakes, and have more energy for the process. If you are really strapped for cash, you’ll be better prepared to evaluate, search, and take contract work to make some extra money.
  • Schedule personal time and keep that commitment. It is okay to watch a little television, but make sure to fill your time playing, having fun, and doing the things you love. Having fun lets you re-energize and reconnect with your true self, providing tremendous insight to what you like and dislike. You’ll be more likely to identify careers that are a good fit and able to articulate to others what you are looking for.
  • Do things and wear clothes that make you feel beautiful. When we go through stressful transitions, our eating habits often become irregular and we don’t dress as fashionably. Employers like to hire confident employees, and the way you dress expresses how you feel about yourself. Get rid of clothing that doesn’t make you feel good, and find ways to get outfits that make you feel beautiful, whether you purchase them or host a clothing swap with your friends. And do things that make you feel confident to reinforce your inner strength and beauty, because when you go back to your career transition, you’ll want to look as beautiful and self-assured on the outside as you feel on the inside.

Taking a break will motivate you and give you the clarity to pursue your next steps. There will always be jobs to apply for, careers to research, and people to meet, but after your break, you will be able get back to your career transition with the positive energy that will get you hired.

3 Ways to Overcome the Emotional Baggage of a Bad Boss

pexels-photo-70292We’ve all had a crappy boss- whether the situation was with a supervisor, manager or client.

As a career coach, I’ve had a handful of clients who struggled to move past the emotional baggage of having a bad boss. And who did it ultimately hurt? My client.

This article doesn’t negate that your boss is responsible for his or her actions. However, it is YOUR responsibility for moving the feelings and emotional baggage that comes with having a bad boss.

You don’t want to bring that baggage into your next endeavors because the law of attraction time and again has proven that negative energy attracts negative energy. Most companies and clients want to hire someone who is positive to work with and a good cultural fit.  Even unconscious negative energy, or false positive energy can be perceived.

Here’s are  3 ways to handle the emotional baggage of a bad boss, so you can overcome and thrive in your next endeavor:

1. Journal- Write anything that comes to mind about your boss or client. Don’t judge yourself for any feelings or emotions that arise and don’t push them down either. Pain deserves to be felt.

I also share with my clients that journaling is not about writing a perfect article; it is meant just for you. If you were to open a page of my personal journal, you probably would find a stream of curse words.

2. Identify, understand and counter your negative beliefs- The actions of your supervisor or client are just actions. It’s the beliefs that you carry about yourself that impact how you interpret those actions.

  • First you need to identify your negative beliefs (e.g. I’m not good enough, I’m not worthy).
  • After, you need to figure out where they came from (most likely a childhood incident).
  • And then you need to counter them (e.g. I am good enough, I am worthy).

When you are able to hold positive beliefs about yourself, the actions of others may still hurt in the moment, but don’t make you suffer in the long run.

3. Stay connected with others- It’s easy to want to isolate from others, especially when you are feeling bullied. However, if you can spend time with supportive colleagues, family and friends, that positive connection can reinforce your self-worth. This is especially important when you are not being supported by someone who is in position of power and you need all the encouragement you can get.

Don’t let an experience with a bad boss hold you back, let it become a learning experience about you how face challenges, overcome obstacles and thrive.